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ADDRESS

P.O. Box 1 Malaybalay City, Bukidnon 8700
Mobile: +63 9178820649


Email: ywambukidnon@gmail.com

We are a non-denominational, non-profit, charitable Christian organization, a family of global mission body called Youth With A Mission (YWAM) founded in 1960 in USA.

Our Bukindon branch seeks to connect with young people through equipping them to be Biblical Christians.

ABOUT US

© 2017 - 2018. YWAM Bukidnon

Do you want to understand the current events of your time and influence your sphere? JOIN US! Seasonal speakers with burning issues to help guide your mind to be

WORLDVIEW

OCT. 1, 2018

Whether searching for the Truth or seeking to grow in your walk with God, YWAM Bukidnon is ideal for introducing, nurturing or equipping you into missions. Our programmes range from teaching

to walk with God daily, to answering life's confrontational questions

in this century.

HIS KINGDOM; OUR PASSION

APRIL 23, 2018

Be like Jesus, learn to hear His voice and walk daily with Him. A 6-month programme of 3 month classroom and outreach each. Ideal for entry into YWAM Schools.

DISCIPLESHIP

JAN. 15, 2018

JAN. 11, 2019

Chronological Bible Core Course (CBCC) is a 12 weeks lecture with a 2 weeks outreach. The students will learn few books of the Bible and read the rest of the Books Chronologically.

BIBLE
NEXT EVENTS
25/FEB
29/FEB

"So do not fear, for I am with you; do not be dismayed, for I am your God. I will strengthen you and help you; I will uphold you with my righteous right hand."

Isaiah 41:10

Debate: God in the Modern World

Wednesday, February 25 at 15:00

Easter Prayers

Sunday, February 29 at 19:00

JOIN US SPREAD THE GOOD NEWS
OF HIS KINGDOM BY PARTICIPATING

We present several opportunities to be involved with us

SHAPING THE FUTURE

ENGAGING YOUTH

Youth With A Mission Bukindon, Phlippines

Welcome to
Bukidnon & Environs

The Bukidnon people have been a diminishing minority in the province that bears their name ever since Filipinos from elsewhere in the archipelago began settling there in growing numbers after World War II. Many have intermarried with these newcomers, and their children have grown up speaking Cebuano-Bisayan, the province's lingua franca today, with 65.9 percent of the population now listing it as their mother tongue. In contrast, only 71,007, or 13.3 percent of the province's population of 532,818 in 1975, reported Binukid as their mother tongue, and only 3,351 of these reside in urban areas. Binukid speakers can be found today mainly in small barangay in the northern municipalities of the province. Few possess either wealth or political power.

THE MEXICAN FILIPINO TRIBE

Mangyan and the Manobo share many traditions and customs, which derive from ties established over 400 years. Both countries were dominated by the Spanish crown. In 1521 Hernán Cortés conquered the Aztec empire; and in the same year, Ferdinand Magellan travelled to Asia and claimed the Philippine islands for the Spanish crown. In 1543, after their discovery, the explorer Ruy Lopez de Villalobos sailed from Barra de Navidad, Jalisco, Mexico, to recognize and name these islands. They were named the Philippine Islands, in honor of Prince Felipe of Asturias.  In 1565, Spanish Governor General Miguel Lopez de Legazpi claimed the Philippines as a Spanish Colony and designated Manila as the capital in 1571. Due to its distance from Spain, the Spanish Government assigned Manila's administration and government to Viceroyalty of New Spain for two and a half centuries. Evangelization and commercialization constituted the core of intercontinental ties between Asia and America that materialized with the Manila-Acapulco galleons trade. Due to the grand exchange with the Philippines in those days, many cultural traits were adopted by one another, with Mexicans remaining in the Philippines, and Filipinos establishing in Mexico, particularly the central west coast, near the port town of Acapulco. Many Nahuatl words were adopted and popularized in the Philippines, such as Tianggui (market fair) and Zapote (a fruit).

THE MANGYAN & THE MANOBO TRIBE

Mangyan and the Manobo share many traditions and customs, which derive from ties established over 400 years. Both countries were dominated by the Spanish crown. In 1521 Hernán Cortés conquered the Aztec empire; and in the same year, Ferdinand Magellan travelled to Asia and claimed the Philippine islands for the Spanish crown. In 1543, after their discovery, the explorer Ruy Lopez de Villalobos sailed from Barra de Navidad, Jalisco, Mexico, to recognize and name these islands. They were named the Philippine Islands, in honor of Prince Felipe of Asturias.  In 1565, Spanish Governor General Miguel Lopez de Legazpi claimed the Philippines as a Spanish Colony and designated Manila as the capital in 1571. Due to its distance from Spain, the Spanish Government assigned Manila's administration and government to Viceroyalty of New Spain for two and a half centuries. Evangelization and commercialization constituted the core of intercontinental ties between Asia and America that materialized with the Manila-Acapulco galleons trade. Due to the grand exchange with the Philippines in those days, many cultural traits were adopted by one another, with Mexicans remaining in the Philippines, and Filipinos establishing in Mexico, particularly the central west coast, near the port town of Acapulco. Many Nahuatl words were adopted and popularized in the Philippines, such as Tianggui (market fair) and Zapote (a fruit).

REACHING OUT TO TRIBES